We were talking a tour around Canada’s biggest mall, in Edmonton, when we decided to stop for lunch. They have lots of restaurants but we really are fans of food courts and we found one, picked a spot to get food and loaded up our trays. We found a table and got into place. We notice another gay couple, in their early twenties, in the area and enjoyed watching the freedom they had to be there and be openly a couple. We watch with not a little envy, I need to confess. This is what we all fought for, and it’s nice to see.

Some others in the area weren’t so welcoming so our guard went up. I feared these kinds of bullies when I was younger, but becoming disabled and through that process discovering the courage with which I needed to live life has made a difference. Those two didn’t notice but we were there and we had their backs.

They each got their food at a different vendor and the bearded one of the two found a table not far from where we were sat. He looked up for his partner, perhaps husband, and waited for his arrival. When he came to the table he leaned over and gave a quick kiss on the lips before sitting down. Most people smiled, which was nice, but weird that they did, they didn’t smile when heterosexual couples did the same. But it’s better than those who were clearly upset.

Now together and now both had food, they still didn’t start. They both took hands and bowed and said a prayer over the food. They said grace before starting. This took everyone by surprise. There wasn’t the smiles any more, there was a real look at the two young men. Like they suddenly saw a relationship, a loving, deep relationship, where before they had seen something ‘cute’ that was ‘novel’ and perhaps even ‘shallow’.

Those two young men. They are change makers. I don’t know if they know that.

But I expect they do.