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Disability Employment Month in British Columbia ,2019

Stay tune will have some highlight in month of September. We will be  highlighting employment success stories.

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Minister’s statement on Disability Employment Month

Victoria Sunday, September 1, 2019 9:00 AM

Shane Simpson, Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction, has released the following statement in celebration of Disability Employment Month:

“September is Disability Employment Month in British Columbia. This is a time to celebrate the contributions of people with disabilities in the workforce and to recognize the many inclusive employers throughout B.C.

“Government is working with the disability and business communities to help ensure people with disabilities have the opportunity for meaningful employment, greater independence and full participation in society.

“Businesses throughout B.C. can receive support with inclusive hiring through the Presidents Group Community of Accessible Employers. It provides employer-focused tools, resources and access to training on how to effectively recruit, hire and retain employees with disabilities.

“WorkBC centres provide support and resources to employees with disabilities, including personalized job-search support and the Assistive Technology Service program, administered provincially through the Neil Squire Society.

“Job seekers and employers can contact their local WorkBC centres to learn more about the Disability Employment Month events held in their area and the resources and supports available to help people with disabilities gain good, worthwhile employment.

“Inclusive hiring helps businesses attract and retain employees with disabilities who make a valuable contribution to the workplace, while also expanding the range of customers and clients. British Columbia is facing a shortage of skilled workers and there are thousands of enthusiastic and motivated people in the disability community who can meet that demand.

“Everyone plays a role in fostering a welcoming workplace culture. We all want B.C. to be an accessible and inclusive province, where people of all abilities can participate in every aspect of life. Working together, we can reach this goal.”

Quick Facts:

  • More than 926,100 British Columbians aged 15 to 64 years, almost 25% of the population, identify as having a disability.
  • Almost 90% of consumers prefer companies that employ people with disabilities, according to a study cited in a 2012 Conference Board of Canada report.
  • The provincial government offers services and programs that support job seekers and employees with disabilities and employers who want to build an inclusive workplace, including:
    • WorkBC centres
    • WorkBC Assistive Technology Services
    • Community Transition Employment Plan
  • There are 102 WorkBC locations throughout the province that serve British Columbians, including people with disabilities. WorkBC also offers 24/7 access through Online Employment Services.
  • The Presidents Group, a group of B.C. business leaders, are encouraging and supporting employers across different sectors to hire more people with disabilities: www.accessibleemployers.ca

Learn More:

Resources for job seekers with disabilities: www.WorkBC.ca/Accessibility

WorkBC Assistive Technology Services: https://www.workbc.ca/Employment-Services/Assistive-Technology-Services.aspx

For employers wanting to learn more about the benefits of hiring people with disabilities, visit: http://accessibleemployers.ca/

B.C. government services for people with disabilities in B.C.: https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/family-social-supports/services-for-people-with-disabilities/supports-services

Disability Employment Month 2019 proclamation: http://www.bclaws.ca/civix/document/id/proclamations/proclamations/DisabilityEmplMnth2019

This on BC Govt website go to the link here

 

Ross Chilton: Untapped talent pool is key to British Columbia’s future

Opinion: September is Disability Employment Awareness Month and Community Living B.C.

has found that in 2019 more than 5,000 adults living with intellectual disabilities are now reporting an income.

 

All British Columbians deserve a meaningful job. We all want to be happy and proud of our workplace culture. We want our employers to thrive and succeed.

That is why it is good news that more and more B.C. businesses are employing people with intellectual disabilities. September is Disability Employment Awareness Month and Community Living B.C. has found that in 2019 more than 5,000 adults living with intellectual disabilities are now reporting an income. That’s up from 2,200 in 2013, although it still represents only 25 per cent of people who Community Living B.C. serves. This is an issue we continue to address with our partners through our Community Action Employment Plan.

This progress is thanks to the hard work of many, including change-driven business champions such as those in the B.C. network called the President’s Group. It’s due to visionary service agencies like those in the B.C. Employment Network. And it’s because of individuals who live with disabilities who are changing perspectives about what is possible.

Positive, dramatic change — the kind that moves businesses and communities from good to great — happens when we become aware of the biases that hold us back. When we see what people, businesses and communities can do, rather than what they can’t. When we see possibilities, rather than limits.

Daynna is the mother of a son who lives with autism and receives services from Community Living B.C. Last year, she was thrilled when a B.C. software company saw the potential of her son. “Soon after, we got the call: Tyler had a job! A paying job!,” recalled Daynna. “This was so amazing for Tyler and our whole family. It was hard to hold back the tears.” Inclusive hiring has the power to transform the future for individuals and their families.

It can also have a dramatic change our workplaces. The facts show that employees who live with disabilities are dedicated, loyal and perform as well as their colleagues. They foster a learning culture, enrich staff connections and improve workforce skills. They help create better, happier workplaces.

And according to accessibleemployers.ca, inclusive workplaces are two times more likely to meet or exceed financial targets, six times more likely to be innovative and six times more likely to effectively anticipate change. How can that be? It’s because companies that see possibilities are the companies that succeed.

Employment is a key element of the government’s poverty reduction strategy and there are resources to help B.C. companies make it happen. The government provides services and supports through Work BC and Community Living B.C. funded agencies for those looking for work and for employers seeking to hire inclusively. Programs like Ready Willing and Able and networks of leading B.C. businesses like the President’s Group, provide other resources and mentors.

This is important, because there are still large numbers of people who live with disabilities whose talents remain untapped. With clear evidence of their potential, and many helping hands, what’s holding us back? We have it within us to drive dramatic positive change for people, businesses and entire communities. It’s just a matter of seeing the possibilities.

Ross Chilton is CEO of Community Living B.C., the provincial Crown corporation that funds supports and services for adults with developmental disabilities, as well as individuals who have a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder or fetal alcohol spectrum disorder and who also have significant difficulty doing things on their own.

This story is from Vancouver Sun Newspaper go to the link here

 

 

 

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