Victoria Friday, June 25, 2021 8:00 AM

British Columbians are being asked to take precautions this weekend, as Environment Canada has issued a heat warning for most of the province, predicting a dangerous, long heat wave beginning Friday, June 25 and lasting until Tuesday, June 29.

Environment Canada notes the record-breaking temperatures will provide little relief at night, with elevated overnight temperatures, increasing the risk of heat-related illnesses. HealthLink BC has these tips for keeping cool and healthy:

  • Never leave children alone in a parked car.
    Temperatures can rise to 52 Celsius (125 Fahrenheit) within 20 minutes inside a vehicle when the outside temperature is 34 C (93 F). Leaving the car windows slightly open will not keep the inside of the vehicle at a safe temperature.
  • Drink plenty of fluids.
    Drink extra water even before you feel thirsty and if you are active on a hot day. Ask your health-care provider about how much water you should drink on hot days if you are on water pills or limiting your fluid intake.
  • Keep cool.
    Stay indoors in air-conditioned buildings or take a cool bath or shower. At temperatures above 30 C (86 F), fans alone may not be able to prevent heat-related illness. Sunscreen will protect against the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays, but not from the heat.
  • Plan activity before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., when the sun’s UV radiation is the weakest.
  • Avoid tiring work or exercise in hot, humid environments.
    If you must work or exercise, drink two to four glasses of non-alcoholic fluids each hour. Rest breaks are important and should be taken in the shade.
  • Avoid sunburn.
    Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher on exposed skin and an SPF 30 lip balm, and reapply often.
  • Wear lightweight, light-coloured, loose-fitting clothing and a wide brimmed hat, or use an umbrella for shade.
  • Regularly check older adults, children and others for signs of heat-related illness, and make sure they are keeping cool and drinking plenty of fluids.
    Check on those who are unable to leave their homes and people with emotional or mental-health challenges whose judgment may be impaired.
  • Heat also affects pets.
    Never leave a pet in a parked car. Limit pets’ exercise, and be sure to provide them with plenty of water and shade.

Home treatment for mild heat exhaustion may include:

  • moving to a cooler environment;
  • drinking plenty of cool, non-alcoholic fluids;
  • resting; and
  • taking a cool shower or bath.

If symptoms are not mild, last longer than one hour, change, worsen or cause concern, contact a health-care provider.

Elevated heat also increases the risk of wildfire, and British Columbians are being urged to do their part to prevent human-caused wildfires and help keep communities safe. To report a wildfire, unattended campfire or open burning violation, call 1 800 663-5555 toll-free or *5555 on a cellphone.

Learn More:

Environment Canada Public Weather Alerts for B.C.: https://weather.gc.ca/warnings/index_e.html?prov=bc

HealthLinkBC online resources about beating the heat: https://www.healthlinkbc.ca/health-feature/beat-the-heat
And heat-related illness: www.healthlinkbc.ca/healthlinkbc-files/heat-related-illness
To ask about heat-related illness, call HealthLinkBC at 811.

BC Wildfire Service: www.bcwildfire.ca

Fire restrictions and bans: http://www.gov.bc.ca/wildfirebans

FireSmart program: www.firesmartbc.ca

PreparedBC: www.preparedbc.ca/wildfires

This on BC Govt website go to the link here

 

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