I can’t write a blog today because I have to write a letter.
Another letter about lack of access, about prejudicial decisions made regarding access and about the need for an immediate, and easy fix.
I write so many of these letters. Pretty much every time I write on this blog, or tell someone about, an access issue, the suggestion is to write a letter or to make a formal complaint.
The advice is good. I know that. But after 12 or 13 years in a wheelchair, I’m tired of letters and complaints and confrontations.

I’m whining now.

I know.

But there is both a physical and emotional cost to the process of these letters. The physical act of writing the letter, working to outline clearly the issue as experienced takes time and energy. Then there is the emotional whammy when the letter is answered with a, choose one:

– I’m sorry you feel that way.

-You need to understand that …

– It’s an old building and therefore …

– We will consider your concerns at some point in the future.

– We welcome your feedback thank you for contacting us.

All of which means that the letter landed into the hollow spot in a business or corporations heart where compassion and fairness and justice have been removed in favour of greed and discrimination and indifference.

So no blog today.

I’ve got to write a letter, this one is one in which I’ve already been told that a public building cannot provide accessibility because they are very busy … that’s what they said … so I’m not going to be writing the government ministers that oversee transportation and disability, along with a copy to the Prime Minister.

So, apologies, see you tomorrow.